Does Caffeine Improve Sports Performance?

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Having Caffeine Before a Workout?

Caffeine – sometimes known as “The World’s Most Popular Drug”

Caffeine is very popular with athletes to help them train, and keep their brain sharp. It is commonly found naturally and stimulates you ingested in foods and drinks.

Is it safe? —- hmmmm – to a certain extent. Here is some information on the details and benefits of caffeine and working out. Also we will include caffeine supplements, energy drinks, Tea, Coffee, as well as ephedrine.

CAFFEINE

What’s the number one reason you go for Caffeine? Probably – Alertness, Energy!! (Of course to reduce fatigue – the slumps….)

Coffee, Energy Drinks and Tea are in the top 10 drinks in the world.

Caffeine is so widely used the studies say that 80% of the world drinks a caffeinated beverage daily – mostly tea or coffee. These drinks have been consumed for thousands of years.

Caffeine also helps improve physical endurance – that’s why so many athletes love coffee, tea, energy drinks, chocolate, and supplements with caffeine.

In Canada they have supplements that are approved to:

  • Promote endurance
  • Promote wakefulness and alertness
  • Relieve feelings of fatigue
  • Enhances motor performance
  • Promotes endurance
  • And — a mild diuretic.

The benefits have been shown to improve sports training taking 100-200 mg 2-4 hours as needed.

The benefits of caffeine –

Increases metabolic rate

Lowers risk of Diabetes

Lowers risk of Cardiovascular disease

As stated above increases mind fullness and alertness.

Negative Effects of Caffeine

Can cause anxiety

Stimulates urination

Reduces fine motor control movements

May increase blood pressure.

SPORTS TRAINING AND CAFFEINE

Caffeine used in sports training and working out has been known to increase training volume (overall work performed) and been shown to decrease fatigue and increase a more powerful output. Yeah!

A study was done with a double-blind controlled study — effects of caffeine on Endurance, Graded, and short-term. The results showed that having caffeine increased exercise the most. Exhaustion was delayed.

The testing was done on Running, Cycling, and Cross-country skiing.

Overall the average improvement was 3.2% to 4.9%.

High Sustained – high intensity exercises such as running, rowing, cycling, and swimming — caffeine helped improve with all of them.

Hydration was a key factor, too. Study shows that ergogenic (enhancing physical performance) doses of caffeine did not dehydrate. The rate of change in sweat rates with urination, or other losses didn’t change. Meaning you do not need to keep drinking fluids with caffeine.

Best to drink 1 hour before you are ready to work out. Also effective during exercise or just when finishing up to control fatigue.

To high of doses of caffeine may cause jitters + Heart rate goes up.

CAFFEINE VS COFFEE/ENERGY DRINKS

Coffee has about 2% caffeine and other compounds. On cup of coffee will have 40 – 180 mg of caffeine while the same amount of tea – et’s say 150 mL 24 – 50 mg. If you still drink soda – a whole other topic – this even has less and cocoa products have less than fruit. Sweet potatoes even have caffeine.

So the studies come in mixed regarding sports performance and caffeine. There was a study published in 2013 that shows a cup of coffee had the same effect on cyclists as a coffee supplement. Both of these sources worked better than decaf coffee and or a placebo.

Energy Drinks? Have you read the ingredients? Well, they say that energy drinks have vitamins, minerals and carbs + taurine is added. Taurine is a (Protein) amino acid that our body makes naturally. By adding this the energy drink producers say it helps with inflammation and antioxidant properties – also suppose to improve cognitive and physical performance – but little research on this stuff.

In February 2017 there was a review of 34 studies looking at energy drinks on performance in sports. The study showed improvement in muscle strength, jumping, endurance, and certain sports improved. Conclusion was the benefits of taurine in the sports drinks and not the caffeine. The study was ONLY done on young athletes – not a overall study.

CAFFEINE AND EPHEDRINE

Ephedrine is an active component of an herb – ‘ephedra’ which is suppose to be an appetite suppressant and fat burning. When caffeine and ephedrine are taken together they are suppose to be have more fat burning than without.

Ephedrine is used in Canada for a nasal decongestant —- and comes with a whole host of warnings, caution, and contradictions.

Probably best to stay away.

CAFFEINE SAFETY

Caffeine is not recommended fr sleep. (Dah!)

Make cause your bladder overreact.

May increase blood pressure.

May cause anxiety, rapid heart rate, insomnia, restlessness, tremors, nervousness and headache.

IN SUMMARY

Caffeine helps with your mind and can increase memory.

Caffeine keeps you alert – especially in times when you really need to be alert.

Caffeine can stimulate hair growth.

Caffeine may help with Parkinson’s Disease.

Caffeine may help ward off Alzeimer’s.

Caffeine drinker have a lower risk of suicide.

Caffeine may reduce risk of skin cancer.

Caffeine can help with asthma – just stay away from dairy.

Please reply with some of your favorite caffeine drinks. My favorite is Fortune Delight especially with some Electro Sport and Evergreen.

REFERENCES

Burke, L.M. (2009). Caffeine and sport performance. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 33(6): 1319-34. DOI: 10.1139/H08-130 Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/23669680_Caffeine_and_sport_performance

Caine, J.J. & Geracioti, T.D. (2016). Taurine, energy drinks, and neuroendocrine effects. Cleve Clin J Med. 83(12):895-904. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.83a15050. Link: http://www.mdedge.com/ccjm/article/120413/adolescent-medicine/taurine-energy-drinks-and-neuroendocrine-effects

Doherty, M. & Smith, P.M. (2004). Effects of caffeine ingestion on exercise testing: a meta-analysis. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 14(6):626-46. Link: htpps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15657469/

Examine.com, Supplements, Caffeine. Accessed March 11, 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/caffeine/

Examine.com, Supplements, Ephedrine. Accessed March 11, 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/ephedrine/

Ganio, M.S., Klau,J.F., Casa, D.J., Armstrong, L.E. & Maresh, C.M. (2009). Effect of caffeine on sport-specific endurance performance: a systemic review. J Strength Cond Res. 23(1):315-24. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31818b979a. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19077738

Health Canada, Natural Health Products Ingredients Database, Caffeine. Accessed March 9, 2017. http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/monoReq.do?id=53&lang=eng

Health Canada, Natural Health Products Ingredients Database, Ephdrine. Accessed March 11, 2017 http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/monoReq.do?id=271&lang=eng

Heckman, M.A., Weil, J & De Mejia, E.G. (2010), Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in Foods: A Comprehensive Review on Consumption, Functionality, Safety, and Regulatory Matters. Journal of Food Science, 75: R77-R78. doi:10.1111/j. 1750-3841.2010.01561.x http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01561.x/full

Hodgson, A.B., Randell, R.K. & Jeukendrup, A>E. (2013). The metabolic and performance effects of caffeine compared to coffee during endurance exercises. PLoS One. 8(4):e59561. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059561 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3616086/

Jówko E. Antioxidants in Sports Nutrition. Chapter 8: Green Tea Catechins and Sport Performance. ©2015 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Bookshelf ID:NBK299060 PMID:26065095 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK299060/

Nehlig, A. & Debry, G. (1994). Caffeine and sports activity: a review. Int J SPorts Med. 15(5):215-23 https:///ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7960313/

Souza, D.B., Del Cosco, J., Casonatto, J & Polito, M.D. (2017). Acute effects of caffeine-containing energy drinks on physical performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Nutr. 56(1):13-27. doi: 10.1007/s00394-016-1331-9. https:www.reserchgate.net/publication/309281522_Acute_effects_of_caffeine-containing energy drinks on physical performance a systematic review and meta-anaylsis

Spriet, L.L. (2014). Exercise and Sport Performance with Low Doses of Caffeine. Sports Med 44(Suppl 2): 175. doi:10.1007/s40279-014-0257-8 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40279-014-2-0257-8

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