Does Caffeine Improve Sports Performance?

Having Caffeine Before a Workout?

Caffeine – sometimes known as “The World’s Most Popular Drug”

Caffeine is very popular with athletes to help them train, and keep their brain sharp. It is commonly found naturally and stimulates you ingested in foods and drinks.

Is it safe? —- hmmmm – to a certain extent. Here is some information on the details and benefits of caffeine and working out. Also we will include caffeine supplements, energy drinks, Tea, Coffee, as well as ephedrine.

CAFFEINE

What’s the number one reason you go for Caffeine? Probably – Alertness, Energy!! (Of course to reduce fatigue – the slumps….)

Coffee, Energy Drinks and Tea are in the top 10 drinks in the world.

Caffeine is so widely used the studies say that 80% of the world drinks a caffeinated beverage daily – mostly tea or coffee. These drinks have been consumed for thousands of years.

Caffeine also helps improve physical endurance – that’s why so many athletes love coffee, tea, energy drinks, chocolate, and supplements with caffeine.

In Canada they have supplements that are approved to:

  • Promote endurance
  • Promote wakefulness and alertness
  • Relieve feelings of fatigue
  • Enhances motor performance
  • Promotes endurance
  • And — a mild diuretic.

The benefits have been shown to improve sports training taking 100-200 mg 2-4 hours as needed.

The benefits of caffeine –

Increases metabolic rate

Lowers risk of Diabetes

Lowers risk of Cardiovascular disease

As stated above increases mind fullness and alertness.

Negative Effects of Caffeine

Can cause anxiety

Stimulates urination

Reduces fine motor control movements

May increase blood pressure.

SPORTS TRAINING AND CAFFEINE

Caffeine used in sports training and working out has been known to increase training volume (overall work performed) and been shown to decrease fatigue and increase a more powerful output. Yeah!

A study was done with a double-blind controlled study — effects of caffeine on Endurance, Graded, and short-term. The results showed that having caffeine increased exercise the most. Exhaustion was delayed.

The testing was done on Running, Cycling, and Cross-country skiing.

Overall the average improvement was 3.2% to 4.9%.

High Sustained – high intensity exercises such as running, rowing, cycling, and swimming — caffeine helped improve with all of them.

Hydration was a key factor, too. Study shows that ergogenic (enhancing physical performance) doses of caffeine did not dehydrate. The rate of change in sweat rates with urination, or other losses didn’t change. Meaning you do not need to keep drinking fluids with caffeine.

Best to drink 1 hour before you are ready to work out. Also effective during exercise or just when finishing up to control fatigue.

To high of doses of caffeine may cause jitters + Heart rate goes up.

CAFFEINE VS COFFEE/ENERGY DRINKS

Coffee has about 2% caffeine and other compounds. On cup of coffee will have 40 – 180 mg of caffeine while the same amount of tea – et’s say 150 mL 24 – 50 mg. If you still drink soda – a whole other topic – this even has less and cocoa products have less than fruit. Sweet potatoes even have caffeine.

So the studies come in mixed regarding sports performance and caffeine. There was a study published in 2013 that shows a cup of coffee had the same effect on cyclists as a coffee supplement. Both of these sources worked better than decaf coffee and or a placebo.

Energy Drinks? Have you read the ingredients? Well, they say that energy drinks have vitamins, minerals and carbs + taurine is added. Taurine is a (Protein) amino acid that our body makes naturally. By adding this the energy drink producers say it helps with inflammation and antioxidant properties – also suppose to improve cognitive and physical performance – but little research on this stuff.

In February 2017 there was a review of 34 studies looking at energy drinks on performance in sports. The study showed improvement in muscle strength, jumping, endurance, and certain sports improved. Conclusion was the benefits of taurine in the sports drinks and not the caffeine. The study was ONLY done on young athletes – not a overall study.

CAFFEINE AND EPHEDRINE

Ephedrine is an active component of an herb – ‘ephedra’ which is suppose to be an appetite suppressant and fat burning. When caffeine and ephedrine are taken together they are suppose to be have more fat burning than without.

Ephedrine is used in Canada for a nasal decongestant —- and comes with a whole host of warnings, caution, and contradictions.

Probably best to stay away.

CAFFEINE SAFETY

Caffeine is not recommended fr sleep. (Dah!)

Make cause your bladder overreact.

May increase blood pressure.

May cause anxiety, rapid heart rate, insomnia, restlessness, tremors, nervousness and headache.

IN SUMMARY

Caffeine helps with your mind and can increase memory.

Caffeine keeps you alert – especially in times when you really need to be alert.

Caffeine can stimulate hair growth.

Caffeine may help with Parkinson’s Disease.

Caffeine may help ward off Alzeimer’s.

Caffeine drinker have a lower risk of suicide.

Caffeine may reduce risk of skin cancer.

Caffeine can help with asthma – just stay away from dairy.

Please reply with some of your favorite caffeine drinks. My favorite is Fortune Delight especially with some Electro Sport and Evergreen.

REFERENCES

Burke, L.M. (2009). Caffeine and sport performance. Applied Physiology Nutrition and Metabolism 33(6): 1319-34. DOI: 10.1139/H08-130 Link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/23669680_Caffeine_and_sport_performance

Caine, J.J. & Geracioti, T.D. (2016). Taurine, energy drinks, and neuroendocrine effects. Cleve Clin J Med. 83(12):895-904. doi: 10.3949/ccjm.83a15050. Link: http://www.mdedge.com/ccjm/article/120413/adolescent-medicine/taurine-energy-drinks-and-neuroendocrine-effects

Doherty, M. & Smith, P.M. (2004). Effects of caffeine ingestion on exercise testing: a meta-analysis. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 14(6):626-46. Link: htpps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15657469/

Examine.com, Supplements, Caffeine. Accessed March 11, 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/caffeine/

Examine.com, Supplements, Ephedrine. Accessed March 11, 2017. https://examine.com/supplements/ephedrine/

Ganio, M.S., Klau,J.F., Casa, D.J., Armstrong, L.E. & Maresh, C.M. (2009). Effect of caffeine on sport-specific endurance performance: a systemic review. J Strength Cond Res. 23(1):315-24. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0b013e31818b979a. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19077738

Health Canada, Natural Health Products Ingredients Database, Caffeine. Accessed March 9, 2017. http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/monoReq.do?id=53&lang=eng

Health Canada, Natural Health Products Ingredients Database, Ephdrine. Accessed March 11, 2017 http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/monoReq.do?id=271&lang=eng

Heckman, M.A., Weil, J & De Mejia, E.G. (2010), Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in Foods: A Comprehensive Review on Consumption, Functionality, Safety, and Regulatory Matters. Journal of Food Science, 75: R77-R78. doi:10.1111/j. 1750-3841.2010.01561.x http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.01561.x/full

Hodgson, A.B., Randell, R.K. & Jeukendrup, A>E. (2013). The metabolic and performance effects of caffeine compared to coffee during endurance exercises. PLoS One. 8(4):e59561. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0059561 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3616086/

Jówko E. Antioxidants in Sports Nutrition. Chapter 8: Green Tea Catechins and Sport Performance. ©2015 by Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Bookshelf ID:NBK299060 PMID:26065095 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK299060/

Nehlig, A. & Debry, G. (1994). Caffeine and sports activity: a review. Int J SPorts Med. 15(5):215-23 https:///ww.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7960313/

Souza, D.B., Del Cosco, J., Casonatto, J & Polito, M.D. (2017). Acute effects of caffeine-containing energy drinks on physical performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Nutr. 56(1):13-27. doi: 10.1007/s00394-016-1331-9. https:www.reserchgate.net/publication/309281522_Acute_effects_of_caffeine-containing energy drinks on physical performance a systematic review and meta-anaylsis

Spriet, L.L. (2014). Exercise and Sport Performance with Low Doses of Caffeine. Sports Med 44(Suppl 2): 175. doi:10.1007/s40279-014-0257-8 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs40279-014-2-0257-8

www.healthoverfifty.com ©SuzAlfano All Rights Reserved 2020.

Plant Based Nutrition for Those Over 50 Years Old

Keeping up your health and eating healthy is not easy after a certain age. Eating the right way does not mean you always have to have boring food- yuck! Plant based foods are so unique and delicious to incorporate into your routine to make meals healthful. When you have either farm fresh veggies or organic from the store they are so tasty compared to the meats, poultry, and salt filled stuff (food).

The Book “How Not To Die” written by the great Dr. Michael Greger, M.D. and “How Not to Diet” start a great challenge which allows you to incorporate the most nutritious possible ingredients to your meal plan and a routine to make you feel active and lively in no time. Check out his app the 12 Things to eat and do daily.

Cruciferous Vegetables

Arugula, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Radish, Turnips, which are low-calorie, and rich in folate, vitamins C, E, and K, and fiber. Cruciferous Vegetables are will help lower inflammation and could possibly reduce the risk of developing cancer. Be sure to eat at least a half a cup a day. By the way – Brussels Sprouts cut up 14 minutes before cooking bring out more of the essence of the veggie.

Beans and Legumes

Beans and legumes are a great antioxidant, good source of protein, reduce cholesterol, decrease blood sugars levels and increase healthy gut bacteria. Some of the top beans are : Garbanzo Beans (delicious as hummus), Lentils, Peas, Kidney Beans, Black Beans, Soybeans, Pinto Beans, Navy Beans, Peanuts (yes peanuts are a legume). A favorite is garbanzo beans with vegannaise, avocado as a tuna replacement.

Berries

Eat at least on serving a day of berries – blackberries are the most nutritious. Berries are high in fiber, can help lower cholesterol levels, and keep you skin looking beautiful. Goji berries are a great snack to carry around with you because they are dried.

Other Fruits

Eat at lease 2 more cups a day of fresh fruit or 1/2 Cup of dried fruit. There is something to say ‘An apple a Day keeps the Doctor Away’. Fruit is rich in nutrients such as potassium, fiber, and Vitamin C. Plus they are naturally sweet!

Greens and other Vegetables

Have at least 2 more vegetables per day on top of the Cruciferous Vegetables – these are so fantastic for your health. Best to have – according to Dr. Gregor – 2 cups raw, and or 1 cup cooked vegetables per day. Onions, Bell Peppers, Carrots, will add color and extra taste to your meals.

Whole Grains

Three servings a day of 1/2 Cup f whole grains is basically what you should have without gaining weight. Whole grains have fiber, Vitamin B, minerals, iron and magnesium.

Flaxseed

Have at least 1 Tablespoon ground daily. This is full of fiber, protein and omega-3. Flaxseed keeps you regular – ha ha.

Vitamin D and Vitamin B12

Vitamin D and B12 are essential and if you get a a healthy Vitamin Supplement you would not take them for granted.

Beverages and Water

Five servings a day of water, tea, coffee, etc. Make sure you keep yourself hydrated. Also drink Green tea, and stay away from sugary drinks.

Spices

Try adding a minimum 1/4 teaspoon of turmeric a day.

Exercise

Keep yourself active during the day. If you sit a lot during the day make sure you stand up at least every hour. Moving around 90 minutes a day should be enough to keep you energized.

Best to have varied foods, nutrient dense, minimally processed foods to meet your daily needs.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26706022

https://www.nbci.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19794127

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19271419

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17151594

© Healthoverfifty.com 2020

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